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Top Philanthropy Job Boards

Nonprofit and Philanthropy Job Boards Associated Grant Makers Bridgespan Chronicle of Philanthropy The Communications Network Common Good Careers Council on Foundations Emerging Practitioners In Philanthropy (EPIP) Idealist National Council of Nonprofits Nonprofit Professionals Advisory Group The Nonprofit Times Opportunity Knocks Philanthropy Journal Philanthropy News Digest Professionals for Nonprofits United Philanthropy Forum Regional Job Boards Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers  Colorado Association of Funders Connecticut Council for Philanthropy Council of Michigan Foundations Northern California Grantmakers Philanthropy New York Philanthropy Northwest Philanthropy Ohio





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Volunteering/Giving Time

Giving time to a charitable cause or organization without receiving financial remuneration. Often refered to as “service” or expanded to include giving talent, energy, expertise, etc. Often combined with other forms of giving, but can be the sole method of donating.

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Top 5 Starting Places for Family Foundations and Donors

By: Michael Moody, Frey Chair for Family Philanthropy at the Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy These five resources in the LearnPhilanthropy Knowledge Library are ideal starting places for grantmakers involved in family giving in some way – as a trustee or staff of a family foundation or a donor-advised fund, as an individual donor, as a consultant or family advisor, etc. This list also points to some of the primary infrastructure organizations serving family grantmakers, and each source has multiple other resources for family donors who want to dig further. Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors: Your Philanthropy Roadmap – The “Philanthropy Read more





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Expert Q & A: How Can a Young Professional Prepare for Advancement?

By: Karen McNeil-Miller, former president of the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust Identify a potential role/level you would like to attain and seek out several people who already have those roles.  Find out the competencies/behaviors/skills needed to be effective in the role currently and in the future Be intentional in your career to seek roles along the way that can offer you an opportunity to develop those skills and competencies. Join EPIP (Emerging Professionals in Philanthropy) Volunteer inside and outside your organization to develop your skills Look for internal developmental assignments such as task forces, workgroups, committees, etc. Network with the people Read more





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LearnPhilanthropy’s Real Simple Taxonomy

By: Dara Major, Philanthropy Consultant Good content needs a good search – but sometimes a simple keyword search is not enough to produce the result a user seeks. That’s where a taxonomy comes in: a taxonomy is a classification or categorization system that groups similar items into broad topics or buckets. A taxonomy can help to organize knowledge “at a glance,” describe concepts not found directly in the content, and includes terms, categories and keywords. LearnPhilanthropy has developed a Real Simple Taxonomy, created with extensive testing and feedback at each stage (and ongoing) by dozens of grantmakers and others across Read more





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Giving Circle/Pooled Fund

A method of giving in which a group of people combine their contributions into a single joint gift or on-going pooled fund. While there are many specific variations in form and process, most giving circles or pooled funds involve some sort of group decision-making about the target and recipients of the joint gift(s).

Categories: Resources





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Operating Foundation

A type of private foundation – with assets usually derived from a single source – that uses the majority of its assets to operate charitable programs or provide services, rather than to make grants or other philanthropic investments. Operating private foundations must follow the general IRS regulations for private foundations, but are treated and classified as a distinct legal category, separate from non-operating foundations. Most operating foundations have an endowment, and some make a limited number of grants alongside operating their programs.

Categories: Resources





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Private Foundation

A tax-exempt entity legally defined under section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code, distinguished from “public charity” entities covered in that same section. Private foundations usually get their funds from a single primary source such as an individual, family, or corporation. The category is further divided by the IRS into “operating” and “non-operating” foundations, with the majority of foundations being the latter (including corporate, family, health conversion, and independent foundations) and pursuing their charitable missions primarily through grantmaking or other philanthropic investments. Many private foundations keep funds in an endowment, though some are “pass through” entities, and they can be Read more

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Public Charity

A tax-exempt entity legally defined under section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code, distinguished from “private foundaton” entities covered in that same section. Public charities derive their funding primarily from the general public, through fees for service or products, contracts, and gifts and grants. Some public charities make grants or other philanthropic contributions such as scholarships (e.g., community foundations, public foundations), but most are focused on advancing their philanthropic missions through a variety of charitable services and activities.The IRS further subclassifies a number of types of public charities, including supporting organizations.

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Public Foundation/Grantmaking Public Charity

A type of public charity that has grantmaking (e.g., for medical research or scholarships) as its primary activity. While these institutions make grants like private foundations, they are classified as public charities and meet the public support test by raising the money they use for grantmaking from multiple public sources, including individuals, corporations, private foundations, contracts and fees, etc. Even though they raise new money from the public on a regular basis, public foundations can also have some endowment.

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Program-Related Investing

A type of impact investing in which a grantmaking institution provides capital in the form of low-interest loans, loan guarantees, or related financing methods that involve some form of repayment. PRI financing is provided to charitable organizations as well as other types such as L3Cs and socially responsible businesses. PRIs are meant to further the mission of the grantmaking institution using means beyond traditional grants, andthey count toward the annual payout requirement (5% of endowed assets) for private foundations.

Categories: Resources





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Social Enterprise/Social Business

A commercial entity that uses business practices and provides products or services that generate revenue in the marketplace, but does so in order to advance a social or charitable mission. Related to the idea of “corporate social responsibility,” but in social enterprises and social businesses the social mission is top priority and all aspects of the business – the nature of its products and services, hiring and personnel policies, environmental practices, etc. – align with that philanthropic mission. B Corps/Benefit Corporations, and L3Cs, are usually considered social businesses.

Categories: Resources





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Social Impact Bond

A new, performance-based investment mechanism bringing together government, service providers, and investors in a contractual relationship to provide the captial needed to achieve some desired social outcome. Also known as “pay-for-success” bonds. Investors provide funding, often through a coordinating intermediary, to a service provider such as a nonprofit organization. If the provider achieves certain outcomes goals and measurable results, then the government pays financial returns to the investors based on the cost-savings the government realizes because of this success.

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Supporting Organization/Supporting Foundation

A subcategory of public charity defined in the Internal Revenue Code and subject to certain special requirements and restrictions. A supporting organizaton exists to benefit, or to perform functions for or of, one or more other public charities. A supporting organization has a very close relationship with another public charity in operations and control. While there are many variations under this IRS category, and while supporting organizations are technically public charities, they often have “foundation” in their name, such as university foundations or hospital foundations that exist to raise money and provide assistance to those institutions and are influenced by Read more

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Volunteering/Giving Time

Giving time to a charitable cause or organization without receiving financial remuneration. Often refered to as “service” or expanded to include giving talent, energy, expertise, etc. Often combined with other forms of giving, but can be the sole method of donating. [gravity forms id=”5″ update]

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Grantmaking

A formalized process of giving money, usually through a private foundation or grantmaking public charity. Grants are usually distinguished from other gifts of money by the formal application and reporting requirements, the specific purposes for which grant funds may be used, a bounded time period for grant funds to be used, and the more explicit strategy used to guide grantmaking decisions.

Categories: Resources





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Health Conversion/Health Legacy Foundation

A type of private foundation created when a nonprofit hospital or health/insurance organization is sold and converted to a for-profit enterprise. Federal law requires that the proceeds from such a sale must go to a charitable purpose, so often these proceeds are used to create a new endowed grantmaking foundation. Health conversion or health legacy foundations usually have health as their primary grantmaking focus, and often give to health causes in the geographic region formerly served by the nonprofit that was sold. Note, however, that these foundations are not legally a separate type or regulatory category.

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Impact Investing

A general term for a number of methods for making socially responsible financial investments. Impact investments seek to generate multiple forms of value, to create positive social and/or environmental returns or impacts in addition to financial returns. Also called “social investing” and encompassing “mission-related investing” (MRI), “program-related investing” (PRI), and other emerging methods. Investments can be made by individuals, organizations, or collectives using a variety of investment vehicles. Impact investment seeks to encourage socially responsible business practices, disinvest in businesses that contribute to social or environmental harm, and provide seed or low-interest loan capital to socially-responsible business ventures. Can also Read more

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In-Kind Giving

Donations of goods or services of any kind – e.g., clothing, “toys for tots,” free advertising space – except money or appreciated property like real estate. Sometimes meant to include gifts of time, talent, and expertise.

Categories: Resources





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Independent, Non-Operating Foundation

A type of private foundation – with assets usually derived from a single source – that has grantmaking or other philanthropic investment as its primary focus, rather than operating programs, but that cannot be classified under other types of private foundations such as corporate, family, or health conversion. Many independent foundations were once family foundations but transitioned away from direct family influence or involvement at some point.

Categories: Resources





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L3C

Short for “Low-profit, Limited Liability Company.” A new hybrid form of incorporation, available in a growing number of states, in which a for-profit venture has a stated goal of maximizing social benefits instead of profits. Designed specifically to allow and attract multiple sources of capital for the socially-oriented business, including program-related investments from foundations. Similar in concept to the new B Corps/Benefit Corporations form of incorporation but a legally distinct form. Often categorized as a “social businesses” or “social enterprise.” A set of methods for providing financial capital, credit, and banking services to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and low-income individuals who Read more

Categories: Resources





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Microfinance

A set of methods for providing financial capital, credit, and banking services to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and low-income individuals who otherwise lack adequate access to such capital and services. Can include loans, savings, “microcredit,” or other banking services and typically involves relatively small amounts of money. The transactions are often processed through online and/or local intermediaries, including specialized microfinance institutions.

Categories: Resources





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Mission-Related Investing

A type of – or sometimes alternate general term for – impact investing. MRI is most commonly used to refer to socially responsible financial investment practices used by foundations or other endowed entities, in which endowment funds are invested in ways that support the mission and values of the organization.

Categories: Resources





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Planned Giving

General term for a variety of methods of giving used in financial or estate planning, in which part or all of the donation is deferred to a later date, usually the death of the donor. Often allows donors to make larger gift commitments than they could otherwise.

Categories: Resources





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Giving Money – Offline, Online, Mobile

Giving money to a charitable organization or cause using offline or online means, or mobile technology. Offline means include checkwriting and direct cash donations as well as formal grantmaking by institutions. Online means include giving through a charity’s direct website, social media, a giving portal or other online giving platform, or a crowdfunding site. Mobile giving uses technology such as text messaging and mobile “apps.” The different methods have different advantages and disadvantages – e.g., the level of convenience, information, fees and restrictions, etc. – and so appeal to different donors or those in particular circumstances. Whether a donor can Read more

Categories: Resources





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Family Foundation

While there is no legal nor widely accepted definition of what qualifies as a “family” foundation, the term is usually applied to a class of independent, non-operating private foundations in which: the mission and giving continues to be strongly influenced by the intent of the founding donor(s), the founding donor(s) or familial descendants play some governance role in the foundation (e.g., as trustees or even staff), and the assets come from a founding family or individual. However, some public foundations, operating foundations, and other types have these qualities as well so can be considered family foundations. Many independent foundations began Read more

Categories: Resources





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Donor-Advised Fund

A fund established – with an initial gift and perhaps subsequent gifts from one or more donors – at a nonprofit public charity which then (for a fee) invests the money and manages the process of making grants from the fund as advised by the donor(s). The most common sponsors of DAFs are community foundations, charitable arms of for-profit financial institutions, and certain national host organizations. DAFs are not subject to the same legal rules at private foundations and are considered gifts to the public charity managing the fund even if the money is then re-granted as “advised” by the Read more

Categories: Resources





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Crowdfunding

A method of raising money for an initiative or organization – often one in the initial or “start-up” phase – from two or more people contributing to the fundraising goal, usually through an online platform.

Categories: Resources





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Donor-Advised Fund

A fund established – with an initial gift and perhaps subsequent gifts from one or more donors – at a nonprofit public charity which then (for a fee) invests the money and manages the process of making grants from the fund as advised by the donor(s). The most common sponsors of DAFs are community foundations, charitable arms of for-profit financial institutions, and certain national host organizations. DAFs are not subject to the same legal rules at private foundations and are considered gifts to the public charity managing the fund even if the money is then re-granted as “advised” by the Read more

Categories: Resources





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Crowdfunding

A method of raising money for an initiative or organization – often one in the initial or “start-up” phase – from two or more people contributing to the fundraising goal, usually through an online platform.

Categories: Resources





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Corporate Giving/Corporate Social Responsibility

Philanthropic contributions made by corporations, using the same methods as individuals (e.g. giving money/grants, time/talent, in-kind products or services, and more). Corporations can give as a corporate entity and/or through a corporate foundation set up as a separate legal entity. “CSR” refers to the general commitment of a corporation to social benefit, including its corporate giving.

Categories: Resources





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Corporate Foundation

A philanthropic entity funded by contributions from a corporate entity, but established as a legally distinct entity. Almost always organized legally as a private foundation focused primarily on grantmaking, but can be a public charity or operating foundation. Contributions from the corporate entity are often made at regular intervals and so corporate foundations usually have smaller permanent endowments than other foundations. While legally distinct from the corporation’s internal giving or social responsibility program, the corporate foundation very often maintains close ties to the corporation beyond simply financial ones. The foundation often gives in geographic areas in which the corporation operates, Read more

Categories: Resources





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Community Foundation

A grantmaking institution with a broad charitable mission, almost always tied to a specific geographic area. Legally categorized as a public charity rather than a private foundation, a community foundation meets the public support test by raising donations from individuals or institutions. It then make grants or other philanthropic investments in the community, under the guidance of a board that is representative of the community. Community foundations offer different methods of giving to donors, including donor-advised funds, gifts to the foundation’s permanent endowment, various planned giving options, or other earmarked gifts or special funds.

Categories: Resources





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Charitable Remainder Trust

A planned giving instrument in which a donor transfers money, property, or other assets to a charitable organization and receives a partial tax deduction, and then the charity pays the donor a fixed sum at regular intervals during his or her lifetime. Upon the donor’s death, the charity keeps the remaining assets as a gift.

Categories: Resources





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Charitable Lead Trust

A planned giving instrument in which a donor transfers money, property, or other assets to a trust at the time of their death, and the trust then pays out a fixed amount to a charitable organization for a set number of years. After this time, the remaining assets in the trust are transfered to the donor’s heirs or other beneficiaries.

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Charitable Gift Annuity

A planned giving instrument in which a donor transfers money, property, or other assets to a charitable organization and receives a partial tax deduction, and then the charity pays the donor a fixed sum at regular intervals during his or her lifetime. Upon the donor’s death, the charity keeps the remaining assets as a gift.

Categories: Resources





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Cause-Related Marketing/Embedded Philanthropy

When a charitable contribution or philanthropic act is built into (or “embedded” in) a commercial transaction, such as when a percentage of proceeds from sale of a product are then donated to a charitable cause or organization by the company selling the product. The company often uses the charitable aspect of the transaction to market the product or service.

Categories: Resources





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Bequest

A method of planned giving in which money, property, or other assets are donated to a charitable organization after a person passes away. Bequests are usually included in a donor’s will or other estate plan documentation.

Categories: Resources





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B Corps/Benefit Corporation

Two new hybrid forms of incorporation, available in a growing number of states, in which a for-profit corporation formally commits to meeting standards of social and environmental performance, transparency, and accountability. Similar in concept tothe  new “L3C” form of incorporation but a legally distinct form .Often categorized as a “social businesses” or “social enterprise.”

Categories: Resources





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The Logic Model Guidebook: Better Strategies for Great Results (Second Ed.): Book Review

The second edition of The Logic Model Guidebook: Better Strategies for Great Results is a straightforward guide, with excellent and varied examples, that achieves its purpose of giving readers a “basic understanding of how to create and use logic models” (p. xii). As enthusiastic champions of logic models, the authors adhere to the assumption that articulating precise and detailed logic models will lead to better results.





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Assessing and Advancing Foundation Transparency: Corporate Foundations as a Case Study

This article explores the mix of forces explaining variability in good-governance standards and practices by charitable foundations. A six-drivers framework for explaining improved foundation accountability and transparency is proposed and discussed in the context of a country study. Those drivers are: regulatory pressures, self-regulation, demands for information from donors and other relevant stakeholders, societal pressure derived from scandals, emulation, and third-party assessment. A simple tool for assessing foundation transparency internationally is proposed and then applied to corporate, endowed, and fundraising foundations in the U.S. and Spain. Foundations’ financial structure compounds with institutional factors to influence the stage of development of Read more





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Tactics in Philanthropy: The Case of the Moving Spotlight

In recent years, strategy has been a much discussed topic in philanthropy, while tactics have received little attention. The experience of the MacArthur Foundation’s environmental program and its Moving Spotlight approach provide examples of the importance of tactical decisions. Tactical decisions such as the timing of grants, foundation staffing levels, and the timing of evaluations all contribute to grantees’ ability to achieve outcomes. Structure and flexibility can be complementary approaches to grantmaking if the tactics are well thought out.





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How Inclusion and Equity Are Transforming a Foundation and a Community

Racial inequities in health care, education, incarceration rates and economic stability have persisted, in spite of federal policies to promote equity. The Denver Foundation launched what is now known as the Inclusiveness Project in 2002 to help nonprofits, including funders, become more inclusive of people of color. The Project defines diversity as one component of inclusiveness; inclusive organizations are defined as learning-centered organizations that value the perspectives and contributions of all people. The Project operates on three levels: individual, organizational and sector. An extensive evaluation has shown that there are impacts at all levels, including increasing the number of people Read more





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A Hedgehog Moment: The Roles and Pitfalls of Strategic Philanthropy for Family Foundations and Donors

The growing quantity of giving has not been matched by improved quality. The growth in the quantity of new philanthropy and the search for more effective philanthropy has now produced a “significant moment in the marketization of philanthropy.” A recent outpouring of books by foundation officials, consultants and academics has broadly emphasized the idea that “strategic philanthropy” in some form promises significant improvements. With these books, then, do donors, family foundations, and philanthropy generally have new usable knowledge to meet the challenge of quality grantmaking?





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The Family Difference? Exploring the Congruence in Grant Distribution Patterns Between Family and Independent Foundations

Using a broad group of family and independent foundations from a representative sample of Georgia foundations, the authors examined differences in giving patterns between family and independent foundations. Findings confirm the result of previous work that studied large foundations. There are no substantial differences between family and independent foundations’ preferences even when controlling for a nonprofit’s location and size. These findings are relevant for discussions about the role of non-family members on boards.





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Next-Generation Philanthropy: Examining a Next-Generation Jewish Philanthropic Network

As a result of mobility, philanthropy among a Millennial group of Jewish donors is becoming divorced from the communities in which their parents live. This group’s members generally perceive themselves as thinking and acting more strategically than past generations. They expect philanthropic organizations to operate with increased transparency, and those entities will need to adapt to these expectations in order to thrive. The characteristics that define the Millennial generation – open-mindedness, a desire for meaningful employment and philanthropic activity, technological adeptness, innovation – are changing philanthropy. Despite those changes, philanthropic priorities among families remain substantially constant and transcend generations.





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I’m Not Rockefeller: Implications for Major Foundations Seeking to Engage Ultra- High-Net-Worth Donors

This article describes how a group of 33 ultrahigh- net-worth philanthropists (UHNWPs) approach their giving. A few key areas dominated their giving priorities: education; health; poverty and social welfare; and children/youth initiatives each were a priority for more than a quarter of participants – with education expressed as an interest of 55 percent. A third of the 24 who responded to the question spent less than 10 percent of their full working time devoted to philanthropy, and 13 dedicated less than 20 percent of their working time. UHNWPs view their peers as their most trusted information resource. After peers, the Read more





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Challenges and Strategies for Family Foundations With Geographically Dispersed Board Members

This article, based on interviews with leaders of 10 family foundations, investigates the impact of geographic dispersion on governance, administration, decision making, and grantmaking activities. The greatest challenges for family foundations with dispersed boards involve assembling an appropriate staff, ensuring strong communication between staff and board members, and focusing the organization’s mission. Maintaining family board member interest in the foundation’s geographic area and bridging and strengthening ties between generations were also concerns. In order to maintain family legacies, all case-study foundations found unique ways to overcome challenges and were deliberate in ensuring that board members stayed actively engaged in the Read more





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What Is a Family Foundation?

Family foundations are important institutions, making up a significant portion of the foundation universe and having both local and global impact. Yet we have no shared definition of this diverse and evolving category. Clarifying the definition will help challenge persistent misconceptions, get perspective on the diversity, and improve foundations’ understanding of their own family dimensions. This article surveys the different definitions of family foundation that are, and have been, used by key organizations in the field and by researchers. It also reviews examples of the variations and complicating factors that make answering the title question difficult. A single or simple Read more





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The Education Collaboration Fund: Possibilities and Limitations of Pooled Funds

Raising money for a pooled fund is time consuming and requires expertise with the funding topic and the target audience. Yet the process of shopping around a pooled fund or collaborative concept can be valuable in its own right, even if most do not participate. Shared interest around a topic or community is a necessary but insufficient reason for participating in a pooled fund. A pooled fund provides an opportunity for individuals and family foundations to learn and grow as donors. Someone with passion, organizational skills, and persistence needs to drive the process forward or it will likely fall by Read more





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Developing a Master Data Sharing Agreement: Seeking Student-Level Evidence to Support a Collaborative Community Effort in Education

A private foundation, a public school system, and a state university joined forces to address a difficult, long-standing challenge: closing the academic achievement gap between urban and suburban students. All parties agreed that sharing of longitudinal, student-level data was required to drive and evaluate multiple efforts to close the gap, but significant technical, regulatory, and political obstacles stood in the way. The parties worked through multiple challenges and forged a Master Data Sharing Agreement (MDSA) that will facilitate both daily intelligence for program staff and powerful post-hoc research capacity. This MDSA text has been released online for your use under Read more





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Changemaking: Building Strategic Competence

Foundations have begun to recognize that how they go about their work is as important as what they support. To be better armed to address the urgent challenges facing Detroit’s children, the Skillman Foundation has adopted a changemaking role that draws upon and leverages its knowledge, networks, and civic reputation to supplement its grantmaking investments. Effective changemaking depends on the accrual of trust and respect that is built over time in relationships with community residents and stakeholders, public and private partners, and others with influence and resources. Changemaking required the foundation to build new strategic competencies such as working across Read more





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Evaluating the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund’s Social Determinants of Health Portfolio

Research over the past two decades repeatedly demonstrates the relationship between poor health outcomes and socioeconomic factors such as poor housing, poverty, racism, and structural inequity. In 2005, the Northwest Health Foundation, supported by the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund, began an initiative to address these social determinants of health (SDOH). A variety of projects – short- and long-term, large and small – were supported over the five-year period for a total of $12.4 million. The mean project-implementation grant was $175,350 and 2½ years in length; capacity-building grants averaged $50,000 for 1½ years. In all, 323 social-determinant accomplishments were identified. The Read more





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Strategies for Impacting Change in Communities of Color

Historically, organized philanthropy has given scant attention to giving among communities of color; however, as the population changes it is becoming more important to learn about and promote giving in these communities. The W. K. Kellogg Foundation supported the Cultures of Giving (COG) initiative over a five-year period to understand, develop, and support philanthropic giving within and among communities of color. COG began with two major principles of action – advancing strategies, approaches, and tactics of community philanthropy and connecting leaders of color in a community of practice such that they might learn, share, and collaborate with each other. Based Read more





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Defining, Building, and Measuring Capacity: Findings From an Advocacy Evaluation

This article reports on results from Mathematica Policy Research’s evaluation of Consumer Voices for Coverage, a program funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to support the role of consumer health advocacy coalitions in 12 states. The foundation based the program on a study that identified six core advocacy capacities, and designed it to strengthen these capacities. The evaluation found that the level of funding, substantial and targeted technical assistance, and the three-year time frame of the program contributed to the observed increases in five capacities. Fundraising remained the lowest-rated capacity for most of the coalitions and may require different Read more





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Building the Capacity of California’s Safety Net: Lessons From the Strengthening Community Dental Practices Demonstration

Community dental practices provide “safety net” services to populations who would otherwise have limited access to care. The financial crisis of recent years has made it increasingly difficult for safetynet dental practices to serve people most in need while still balancing their books. The California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) and the California Pipeline Program (CPP) funded a demonstration project to test the effectiveness of practice-management consulting as a strategy for helping California’s community clinics survive and thrive. This model emphasizes customized technical assistance to enhance the business infrastructure behind the delivery of care. The evaluation of this demonstration revealed that most Read more





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Helping Government Agencies Become More Effective and Efficient: Discovering ‘Catalytic Combinations’ in Public Child Welfare Reform

This article describes work of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Casey Strategic Consulting Group (CSCG), a 10-year, multistate initiative that embeds outside experts – both public-system and traditional management consulting – in child and family services systems to improve system performance and outcomes. The article describes five types of levers that were influenced in different combinations to promote change in different state systems. We call these “catalytic combinations.” In numerous states, including Maine, Louisiana, Virginia, and Indiana, the CSCG initiative produced measurable improvements in key performance areas, including shortening stays in foster care, improving rates of permanent placements for children Read more





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Bridging Silos, Improving Systems

Systems that provide services to children tend to operate in silos; foundations can play a role in helping bridge these silos by supporting “systems building” efforts. Using examples from two foundations and two communities, this article explores the challenges and lessons learned in systems building work. Educating grantees and other community members about systems and systems building is a critical first step in the process. Supporting systems building requires an iterative process and foundations should continuously reinforce the importance of systems building activities.





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Corporate Giving Gets Smarter: ConAgra Foods Foundation Fights Childhood Hunger

This article discusses how a better “map” can develop strategic focus and alignment, increasing the potential for results. Program development and evaluation are best done hand in hand. In complex systems, co-construction has huge yield. It promotes accuracy, comprehensiveness, and utility. Grantmakers can provide more than funding; they can identify and use new tools, processes, and resources with multiple stakeholders for effectiveness. Alignment and integration are powerful principles inside and outside organizations as well as across sectors in pursuit of social change.





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Building the Capacity of Networks to Achieve Systems Change

Networks have historically played an essential role in promoting progress in areas such as social justice, political reform, environmental protection, and public health. Foundations are increasingly recognizing the power of networks and looking for strategies to help networks achieve their potential. The most common strategies are: a) convene a new network around a mission in line with the foundation’s interests, or b) make grants to an existing network whose interests align with the foundation’s. Each strategy has practical limitations. This paper analyzes an alternative strategy developed by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation (MRBF). In addition to providing networks with grants, Read more





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Evaluation for Models and Adaptive Initiatives

Although there has been a growing emphasis on use of experimental designs in evaluation, there is also increasing agreement that evaluation designs should be situation specific. The nature of the program is one of the key factors to consider in evaluation design. Two types of programs – models, which provide replicable or semi-standardized solutions, adaptive initiatives, which are flexible programming strategies used to address problems that require unique, context-based solutions – require different evaluation designs. Evaluation of models requires understanding the stage of development of the model program, with summative evaluation done only when the model is fully developed. Adaptive Read more





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Using Civic Engagement and Collaboration to Create Community Change: Lessons From Charlotte, N.C.

The city of Charlotte, N.C. undertook a deliberative democracy process using the AmericaSpeaks “21st Century Town Meeting” process. The University of North Carolina-Charlotte performed a retrospective, process evaluation of the initiative examining the initiative’s components, coverage, participant feedback, short-term outcomes, and lessons learned. Early planning and implementation was done by volunteers, which ultimately was not sustainable. A new center, housed within an existing organization, was created to implement the recommendations. The initiative achieved a number of early successes, such as increasing the number of school nurses, expansion of an early childhood development program and an increase in after-school and summer Read more





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Practice, Practice, Practice: Preliminary Findings From an Evidence-Based Practice Funding Initiative at The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation

The Tower Foundation supported a five-year initiative to support the implementation of evidence based practices (EBP). The average award was a three-year award of $84,050. The underlying grantmaking theory of change was that behavioral health providers could bring empirically tested protocols to their communities and sustain them over time if supported by long-term funding to support the real costs of implementation (e.g., training, technical assistance, adherence to program protocols, and cultural change). Grantees cited the high cost of training, certification, and recertification – especially in the face of high staff turnover – as a primary challenge to implementing EBPs. Several Read more





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Investigating the Roles of Community Foundations in the Establishment and Sustainability of Local College Access Networks in Michigan

Community foundations have a long history of supporting college access, particularly through the management of scholarship programs. This article examines the role of community foundations in the creation and establishment of local college access networks (LCAN) across the state of Michigan. We use the collective impact model as a framework to examine the roles of community foundations in the creation and development of LCANs. Our findings illustrate that community foundations have played a variety of roles, from fundraising to convening to cheerleading. The success of the community-foundation approach to LCAN development is evident both in the interviews conducted and the Read more





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Dimensions of Change: A Model for Community Change Efforts

The Dimension of Change Model (DOCM), developed by the authors, is offered as a potentially useful tool for foundations, government, bodies, consultants, coalitions, and even individual organizations that are initiating or engaged in substantive efforts to bring about community change. The dimensions contained in the model – structure, parameters, intention, approach, and people – offer a frame for addressing key aspects that emerge from the literature as fundamental to all change efforts. The model is offered as a way to design, implement, adapt, and evaluate change initiatives. The work of First 5 Marin Children and Families Commission in Marin County Read more





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The Role of the Congregation in Community Service: A Philanthropic Case Study

The Family Leadership Initiative (FLI), part of the larger Gatherings of Hope Initiative, was a collaboratively designed program to strengthen families and improve children’s education in Grand Rapids, Mich. FLI was launched in 2011 with two cohorts of 20 congregations who took part in a six-step design process. Programs were implemented in fall 2011. The program entailed holding monthly meetings for parents and children that included bonding time, parent education and homework support for students, and time for ministry. The initial evaluation shows high levels of satisfaction, with students reporting some academic improvements. For the congregations, FLI provided a rare Read more





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Philanthropy in the Faith Community: Mobilizing Faith-Based Organizations for Substance Use Prevention

· The Assistance for Substance Abuse Prevention Center, established by the Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati, has worked with community partners in the faith community to prevent alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse. · Reviving the Human Spirit (RTHS) was a collaborative project that provided resources to help congregations provide substance use prevention and recovery support in their communities, including the adoption of evidence-based practices. · Slightly more than two thirds of the congregations that participated in follow up interviews reported that their programs were still operating. · Faith-based programs have many things in common with programs operated by other Read more





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Building the Bridge for Diversity and Inclusion: Testing a Regional Strategy

Transforming Michigan Philanthropy Through Diversity & Inclusion (TMP) is a six-year research and development effort of the Council of Michigan Foundations (CMF). A unique experiment, TMP is the only statewide, comprehensive effort to promote diversity and inclusiveness among foundations in the country. Organizational excellence through diversity and inclusion requires an organization to find a goal that resonates with its stakeholders and then create collaborative communities that focus on achieving that goal. This strategy positions an organization to use the full diversity of those stakeholders for tasks such as problem-solving, innovation, quality initiatives, and the acquisition of resources. Diversity and inclusion Read more





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Who Becomes a Foundation CEO? An Analysis of Hiring Patterns, 2004-2008

This study provided baseline data about the professional and individual characteristics of 440 candidates selected to be the top executive in a grantmaking institution during a five-year study period (2004-2008), and about the hiring patterns of the diverse institutions making these appointments. Most new chief executive officers (79.5 percent) were not hired from within the same foundation. The percentage of external appointments grew in each successive year of the study period. Most new foundation CEOs (67 percent) were not working for a grantmaking institution when they were appointed. This majority made the transition from fields outside of philanthropy, such as Read more





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Sustainability Is Made, Not Born: Enhancing Program Sustainability Through Reflective Grantmaking

This article explores how reflective grantmaking can lead to enduring changes in the communities that foundations serve. The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati’s approach to evaluating and improving the sustainability of grant-funded projects is reviewed as an example. Their grantmaking framework includes policy and advocacy work, evaluation support, communications support, and technical assistance in addition to traditional funding of projects. This framework promotes sustainability of the funded work.





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Moving Diversity Up the Agenda: Lessons and Next Steps From the Diversity in Philanthropy Project

The Diversity in Philanthropy Project (DPP) was a three-year, voluntary effort of foundation trustees, senior staff, and executives of philanthropy support organizations committed to increasing diversity and inclusive practice across organized philanthropy’s boards, staff, grantmaking, contracting, and investing. DPP had significant achievements, including mobilizing greater commitment among foundation leaders to voluntary action on diversity and enhancing both the knowledge base and data methodologies available for understanding diversity, inclusion, and equity in foundation work. The initiative also faced its share of challenges, including difficulty assessing the impact on the diversity performance of foundations, slow adoption of recommended principles and practices, and Read more





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Designing an Evaluation of a New Initiative: A Practical Approach to Ensure Evaluation Use

This article describes the process of planning an evaluation of the Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy initiative. The initiative was launched in 2007 to reduce tobacco use among American Indians, who disproportionately suffer the negative health effects of tobacco use. The work of the initiative and the evaluation had to incorporate an understanding of tribal structure as well as of the traditional use of tobacco in American Indian sacred ceremonies. The theory of change was conceptualized as circular, rather than linear, in keeping with American Indian philosophical traditions. The planning process, utilizing evaluators familiar with community mobilization and policy evaluation Read more





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Social Movements and Philanthropy: How Foundations Can Support Movement Building

As foundations seek to catalyze broad-based social change, there is a need for greater understanding of what social movements are, how they evolve, and how foundations can support them. Movement building presents unique challenges to foundations. Because movements, by definition, must be driven by the people who are most affected, foundations cannot determine the goals and timetables of a movement. The authors identify five core elements to movement building: organizing an authentic base; leadership; vision and ideas; alliances; and advocacy infrastructure. A framework for evaluating movement building is proposed, which can help foundations identify measureable outcomes and track progress throughout Read more





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Paradigm Shift: A Foundation/Grantee Partnership Using Data to Drive Neighborhood Revitalization and Assess Impact

The Wachovia Regional Foundation spearheaded the formation of a partnership to create a participatory outcome evaluation framework for its neighborhood revitalization work. The framework integrates the use of primary and secondary data and has been modified and improved to strengthen a variety of the foundation’s comprehensive neighborhood revitalization efforts. Forty-one community-based organizations have utilized the framework as a key tool to craft and implement neighborhood plans in a 62-county region. The framework has enabled grantees and residents to better understand and capitalize on market dynamics, enhance their participation in revitalization activities and begin to demonstrate the impact of sustained, strategic Read more





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Building and Supporting Sustainable Fields: Views from Philanthropy

This paper defines a field, provides examples of how funders build fields, lists the elements of a strong field, and discusses effective donor practices to promote sustainable fields.  The paper concludes with questions that can help to assess field strengths and needs, and a discussion of the best time to exit a field.







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Do More Than Give: The Six Practices of Donors Who Change the World

This resource features the stories of foundations and individuals who transcend traditional philanthropy, and illuminates the six catalytic practices that all donors can employ to achieve greater impact.This book provides a blueprint for foundation leaders, trustees, and individual donors who want to catalyze change in the world.





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Creating Shared Value

Creating shared value involves value creation for business that simultaneously yields more profit and greater social impact, resulting in powerful transformations and opportunities for growth and innovation in both business and society. The concept of creating shared value focuses on the connections between societal and economic progress, and has the potential to unleash the next wave of global growth and competitive advantage.





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From Insight to Action: New Directions in Foundation Evaluation

After a year of research and nearly 100 interviews with foundation leaders and evaluation experts, FSG has released a report that identifies a fundamental transition in the way foundations use evaluation. The study was funded by the William & Flora Hewlett Foundation, and conducted in collaboration with the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers.









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Roles@Work: Are you playing with a full deck?

This tool includes a card deck with 29 job roles that are typically expected of grantmakers, and includes a brief explanation of what they are. Use the cards to jumpstart a conversation among colleagues about topics like how you weigh different roles, what you do too much of or not enough of, how you orient newcomers, or how you talk about the grantmaker’s role with board members and leaders.







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Reflection on Practice Video: Starting as a New Grantmaker

This video looks at a variety of issues commonly faced by new program officers as they take up their role — from finding promising ideas to support, to understanding the dynamics of good grantee/grantor relations, to helping grantees collaborate effectively with others.







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Programming on a Blank Slate: A Case on grantmaking in rural poverty

This case study tells the story of one grant maker’s experience in starting a new grantmaking program from scratch — no prior grantees, no established procedures, and no set objectives. Highlights: Taking up a new job in a new field; Identifying key issues to address; Narrowing the field & making your first decisions.





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Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Change to Guide Planning and Evaluation

This brief guide explains why grantmakers use theories of change to guide their questioning, unearth assumptions that underlie their work, establish common language, and develop strong action plans. Contributors to the guide also describe how a theory of change sets the stage for evaluation by clarifying goals, strategies, and milestones.











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Funding Community Organizing: Social Change Through Civic Participation

In this guide, funders and organizers discuss what makes community organizing unique and uniquely effective, how to manage grantee relationships over time, understanding the value of process, and the grantmaker’s special role in fostering change.







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Building Financial Strength & Program Quality: A case on grant making to strengthen organizations in a field

In this case study, the reader will learn about a grantmaker who created a new program to strengthen community foundations – building both their financial wealth and the effectiveness of their programs. What choices would you have made? Highlights: Choosing a strategy; Shaping a new program initiative; Using an RFP to advace your goals.





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Translations of GrantCraft Guides

While GrantCraft materials are developed in English, several guides and other resources are available in different languages. These materials have been translated by partnering organizations and adapted for use by native speakers. German, French, Russian, Japanese, Spanish, Arabic.





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Lessons for Philanthropy: A Journey into Indian Country

This report chronicles five years of work to build and strengthen relationships between organized philanthropy and Native Americans and First Alaskans in our region. With pictures, poetry and stories, the report explores how Philanthropy Northwest members are seeking to better understand Native history and culture, and to expand opportunities for deeper, strategic philanthropic partnerships between Natives and non-Natives.  







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An Assessment of Capacity Building in Washington State

This study looks at capacity building from a strategic, statewide perspective and provides a framework for thinking systematically about capacity-building investments at a state or community level; an assessment of the capacity building landscape; and opportunities for investment.





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Case for Change Capital in the Arts

“The Case for Change Capital” outlines core principles and practices that can improve capitalization in the sector but that will require changes in behavior by both nonprofits and funders alike. The piece tells how each of the participating organizations is applying change capital to undertake meaningful artistic, organizational and financial change.







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Working With Consultants: What You Should Know for A Productive Relationship

This brief provides tried and true advice to grantmakers who are considering or seeking outside expertise. Topics include: Reasons grantmakers turn to consultants Components of a successful consultant/grantmaker relationship Ways to use a consultant How to identify possible consultants How to choose and retain a consultants