The Foundation Review (Volume 8, Issue 4) October 2016 - LearnPhilanthropy

The Foundation Review (Volume 8, Issue 4) October 2016

$29.00

The articles in this issue highlight the ways in which foundations, government organizations,and community members have come together to address these issues, as well as describe the new and innovative approaches being brought to bear in this important work.

Article Summaries: 

Connor, Church, and Yondorf examine the development of the Early Childhood Mental Health Funders Network, an organization of more than 12 community, private, and family foundations, to develop shared strategies for promoting the behavioral health of young children and families.

Gagne analyzes the efforts of Mile High Connects, a collaborative working to ensure that the Denver region’s $7.8 billion transit project benefits low-income communities and communities of color by connecting them to affordable housing, healthy environments, quality education, and good-paying jobs.

The Colorado Health Foundation implemented significant changes to how they invest and operate. Fort and Price assessed the uses of strategic communications as an integral tool in announcing and implementing these changes.

Csuti and Barley explore how The Colorado Trust confronted the fact that the lives of many Coloradans remained fundamentally unchanged after years of nonprofit-led grantmaking.

Easterling and Main explore the tension between trusting the wisdom of communities versus trusting scientific evidence. This tension arises not only across the field of philanthropy, but also within individual foundations.

The final article in this issue is not specific to Colorado philanthropy, but addresses a sector-wide issue, the fit between foundations and how they conduct evaluation. Coffman and Beer point out that foundations have become more variable in how they address their missions. This variability means that there is no one right model for how a foundation’s evaluation function should be designed.

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The Foundation Review (Volume 8, Issue 4) October 2016

$29.00

Sponsored by the Colorado Trust, this issue of The Foundation Review focuses on several philanthropic initiatives in the state of Colorado.  Click the image for additional information on each article.

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Product Description

The articles in this issue highlight the ways in which foundations, government organizations,and community members have come together to address these issues, as well as describe the new and innovative approaches being brought to bear in this important work.

Article Summaries: 

Connor, Church, and Yondorf examine the development of the Early Childhood Mental Health Funders Network, an organization of more than 12 community, private, and family foundations, to develop shared strategies for promoting the behavioral health of young children and families.

Gagne analyzes the efforts of Mile High Connects, a collaborative working to ensure that the Denver region’s $7.8 billion transit project benefits low-income communities and communities of color by connecting them to affordable housing, healthy environments, quality education, and good-paying jobs.

The Colorado Health Foundation implemented significant changes to how they invest and operate. Fort and Price assessed the uses of strategic communications as an integral tool in announcing and implementing these changes.

Csuti and Barley explore how The Colorado Trust confronted the fact that the lives of many Coloradans remained fundamentally unchanged after years of nonprofit-led grantmaking.

Easterling and Main explore the tension between trusting the wisdom of communities versus trusting scientific evidence. This tension arises not only across the field of philanthropy, but also within individual foundations.

The final article in this issue is not specific to Colorado philanthropy, but addresses a sector-wide issue, the fit between foundations and how they conduct evaluation. Coffman and Beer point out that foundations have become more variable in how they address their missions. This variability means that there is no one right model for how a foundation’s evaluation function should be designed.